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sewing and a belated link

Hey everyone!  I have a bit of a different post for you today.  I’ve been doing some sewing and wanted to share it with you.

As you can guess, working on a food truck is very hot.  Working outside the food truck for hours in the sun is also very hot.  Appropriate attire is a bit tough to figure out — if you wear a shirt you’ll need an undershirt to keep your sweat from showing through, which works but also makes you a bit hotter.  Dresses are ideal for standing outside (inside the truck you need to stick with the shirts), but there is the problem of wind.  I was nearly discommoded by a strong breeze a couple of weeks ago, but I caught the skirt before it flew up.  Here’s the dress, which as you can see is a bit short, meaning the problem is likely to happen often:

sewing dress

That close call reminded me of something I’d heard a long time ago about sewing things into the hem of a dress to weigh it down just a bit and keep it from blowing up.  The best options I could think of were cheap chain necklaces or small fishing weights.  The fishing weights were really cheap, so I went with those:

sewing weights

They actually don’t weigh very much (although heavier options are available), but since the fabric is so thin I didn’t want to weigh it down too much and make it look weird.  I went to my handy dandy sewing box, which my mom used to use:

sewing box

Using navy thread, I hand-sewed a fishing weight every 5 inches along the hem of the dress:

sewing done

Testing it out today revealed that the fishing weights do indeed help with breezes, but are still not effective against stronger gusts of wind.  I’m debating on getting another pack (they’re only about $1.50) and sewing more in.  It took such a long time though, working with such tiny things and making sure that they were securely attached, that I’m not up to doing more right now.

The second thing I wanted to mention today is a bit belated.  Over a week ago, Rachel from The Little Room of Rachell made a guest post on another blog about how to crochet if you are left-handed.  Being right handed myself, I never really thought of how troublesome it would be to try to learn as a leftie from right-handed instructions (which pretty much everything is), but now I see that it would definitely be nice to have some instruction.  I just wanted to link to her post so you can see it, if you haven’t already.  The post is on the blog Slugs on the Refrigerator; click here for the post!  I had actually never seen that blog before, so I subscribed immediately — it looks great!

That’s all for today, thanks for stopping by!  The next CAL post is already scheduled, so get ready for Saturday!

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5 days, 5 stripes

I’ve been working on the paulie cardigan and I’ve gotten 5 stripes finished:

paulie5stripesThe edges are a bit curly but you get the drift.  I’m really liking it so far and it’s fitting fine, too, so I can’t wait to get it done!

pauliestripescloseI must say that the purling rows are really slowing me down, but that’s OK.  It’s looking so pretty!

That’s really all I’ve got to show today, and nothing too thrilling has been going on in my life this week.  Chris and I are still doing wing chun with our friend and I’m already noticing a difference in my flexibility and maybe even weight loss.  (Is is too soon to really tell?  I dunno, I may be imagining that.)  It’s fun, in any case, and it really is making my mood better in general.  My old therapist was telling the truth when she said exercise makes you feel better!

Thanks for stopping by, hope you stop by again soon!

 

 

progress and a book

Check out my office at my internship:

right of the door

right of the door

left of the door

left of the door

It’s the catch-all room for old kids toys and games, as well as old office equipment and documents nobody needs anymore.  For some reason, none of this can be thrown away.  There are two more desks in the corner from which I was taking the pictures, covered in more junk.  This office is at the end of the hall, so nobody really calls me to come and do anything anymore since I’m so far away (last semester my office was in the middle of the building).  This means I can just chill and do whatever in my spare time:

pauliegarterThat’s what I had done at my internship (I’ve since added a few more rows but it’s still garter stitch).  It’s the beginnings of this cardigan.  I’m about to switch to stockinette, divide the body and sleeves, and start the stripe pattern, so it’ll be interesting from here on out.  Check out my carefully marked pattern:

pauliepatternDo you mark up your printed patterns like this?  Sometimes I even write straight into books (if they’re my books).

And speaking of books, look what I got:

bookI found it used on Amazon, and it was recommended on The Sweaty Knitter‘s blog some days ago.  I’d love to be able to just make something without having a complicated written pattern, and this book tells you how.  The percentage system is easy enough, but the sweater blueprints provided definitely assume that you have some skills (like how to make an underarm gusset).  It does tell you how to steek, however, which is something I’d been wondering about.  Overall a very useful book with tons of information on how to design your own sweater and what yarns to use, and it has lots of colorwork charts from all over the world.  Pretty neat!

So that’s all for today.  Sorry I’ve been focusing on knitting more or less exclusively — I’m definitely in a crochet slump.  I have yarn but I just do not know what I want to crochet!  I’ve found some cute patterns on Ravelry, but nothing that jumps out and says “HANNAH, MAKE ME NOW!!!”  Or if it does say that, I don’t have enough yarn.  I love me some big projects…

Thanks for stopping by!

 

 

 

paulie: begin!

Thanks everyone for all of your feedback and advice!  I cast on the Paulie cardigan with the 3.50 mm needles and it’s looking pretty good so far:

pauliecastonMy increases are a little wonky but with blocking hopefully they’ll look a little neater.  I’m just so pumped to have finally started that I had to share, even though there’s not much to look at yet, haha.  You can see, though, that I’ve printed off my pattern and am carefully circling the stitch numbers for the medium size, and I’m checking off rows as I go.  The sweater looked a little big to me, but when I held it up around my shoulders and positioned it correctly, it looked right.  I can’t wait to get far enough where I’ll know for sure if I have to rip it out and start over or not…

That’s all I’ve got for today, I just had to share!  Thanks for stopping by!

 

really?

I can’t believe it’s been a whole week since I posted last — it doesn’t feel like it at all.  I guess it’s time for an update!

Firstly, I got my yarn in for the sweater I’m going to make:

sweateryarn

It’s the Silver and Raspberry fingering weight Stylecraft Special acrylic yarn, and it is so soft!  I’m so glad I got this because it was very affordable, it’s deliciously soft, it won’t be too hot, and I can wash it!  I don’t usually make gauge swatches and I really shouldn’t need to with this yarn, but since it’s my first sweater I want to make sure everything is as perfect as possible, so I’m gonna swatch the yarn and wash it before I start.

So now all I’m waiting for to start the sweater is the knitting needle tips that I ordered.  They should be here soon, I think, but there was no tracking number in my receipt so I’m not sure where it is exactly.

I also ordered some blocking mats and T-pins from knitpicks.com, and they’ve arrived, but I don’t guess those are really worth pictures.  Can you believe I’ve been crocheting/knitting for years and I’ve never blocked anything?  Hehehe.

I’ve also been working on those knitted socks, but I don’t want to show you yet — I’m saving any pictures for the ‘ta-da’ moment.  I just have a couple more inches to go and then the ribbed cuffs, so it shouldn’t be long.

Thanks for stopping by!  Hopefully when you come back next I’ll have some socks to show you and maybe the beginnings of a sweater!

 

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